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Prof. Martin Golubitsky

Cullen Distinguished Professor of Mathematics, University of Houston

President, Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM)
Prof. Golubitsky completed his PhD at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1970, under the supervision of the renowned geometer Victor Guillemin. He has been Professor at University of Houston since 1983. He has also been associated with the leading mathematical centres of the world, such as the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, the University of California at Berkeley, and the Fields Institute.
His research areas are nonlinear dynamics, bifurcation theory, and applications -- specifically the role of symmetry in pattern formation and network architecture in the dynamics of coupled systems. Recently he has focused on symmetry in biological applications: animal gaits, the visual cortex, and coupled systems.
Apart from his research articles, Prof. Golubitsky has published an undergraduate text (Linear Algebra and Differential Equations Using MATLAB, with M. Dellnitz) as well as a non-technical work (Symmetry in Chaos: A Search for Pattern in Mathematics, Art, and Nature, with M. Field).
Professor Golubitsky will speak not only on the mathematical frontiers that he has pushed back, but also his personal experiences with mathematics and mathematicians. As President of SIAM he is deeply engaged in efforts to increase the numbers of students who study mathematics and computational science at colleges and universities, and to improve public understanding and reinforce positive impressions of these fields.
The background image is a “chaotic quilt” that was composed by Prof. Golubitsky using the mathematics of symmetric chaos on the torus.
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